CONTRIBUTOR

Saul Noam Zaritt

Harvard University

Saul Noam Zaritt is an assistant professor of Yiddish Literature at Harvard University. He is currently a senior editor at In geveb and one of the site's founding editors. He completed his doctoral studies in Jewish Literature at The Jewish Theological Seminary where he wrote his dissertation on the convergence of Jewish American writing and the institutions and markets of world literature. His academic work appears in Prooftexts, Studies in American Jewish Literature, and American Literary History. He has held fellowships from Washington University in St. Louis, the YIVO Institute, and the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture and has an MA in Hebrew Literature from Hebrew University.

RELATED ARTICLES

Blog

Yiddish Lives! Loshn of the Living Dead

Saul Noam Zaritt and The Editors

Yiddish is Dead! Yiddish is Alive! Yiddish is the Living Dead?

Blog

The Latest in Yiddish Studies in English: 2016

Rachelle Grossman and Saul Noam Zaritt

A bibliography of the prolific output of Yiddish scholarship published in English last year.

Text & Translation

אַ ייִדישע היסטאָריקערין פֿון לובלין

A Jewish Historian from Lublin

Jacob Glatstein

Translation by Sunny Yudkoff and Saul Noam Zaritt

Jacob Glatstein reminisces about the spa town of Nałęczów and about Bella Mandelsberg, a young historian he met there.

Blog

Yiddish, Translation, and a World Literature To-Come

Saul Noam Zaritt

In geveb’s founding editor discusses different models of Yiddish in relation to world literature through the figures of Sholem Asch and Jacob Glatstein.

Text & Translation

דער מאַרש צו די גױים

The March to the Goyim

Jacob Glatstein

Translation by Saul Noam Zaritt

A no-holds-barred essay from Jacob Glatstein on publishing, translation, and world literature.

Blog

Precarious Chains: Reflections on Translating Yiddish

Saul Noam Zaritt

Chief Editor Saul Noam Zaritt introduces our series of essays reflecting on the state of Yiddish translation.

Interview

“Nothing’s of use to me, except this little song”: Norbert Hirschhorn Reimagines Yiddish Song

Saul Noam Zaritt

A new volume of poetry that re-imagines Yiddish folk song as confession, political protest, and playful soundscape.

Blog

Second Avenue Meets Broadway: New York’s Yiddish Theater at MCNY

Saul Noam Zaritt

An interview with Stefanie Halpern, assistant curator of the current exhibition on New York’s Yiddish Theater at the Museum of the City of New York.

Blog

The Latest in Yiddish Studies in English: 2014-2015

Saul Noam Zaritt and The Editors

A bibliography of scholarly works in Yiddish Studies published in English over the last two years.

Blog

Yiddish Counterlives, or How to Think Beyond Broadway Yiddish

Diana Clarke and Saul Noam Zaritt

When American popular culture imagines Yiddish as a language of vulgar comedy, how can Yiddish cultural activists respond?

Article

Yiddish Studies From a New Perspective

Mikhail Krutikov

Translation by Saul Noam Zaritt

Mikhail Krutikov calls for the revival the intellectual relations, coordination, and exchange between the different corners of Yiddish Studies.

Interview

Dreams and Technicalities: Birobidzhan Reimagined in Song

Saul Noam Zaritt

Listen to a contemporary rethinking of Birobidzhan, the longed-for but mostly imaginary Jewish territorial project.

Pedagogy

Yidish in ale lender! Harvard’s Campaign for Yiddish

Saul Noam Zaritt

Attracting students to Yiddish language courses is often a challenge; here’s an example of one teacher’s Yiddish ad campaign.

Interview

Digital Futures: The Great Hope of Yiddish OCR

Saul Noam Zaritt

Refoyl Finkel talks to In geveb about making digitized Yiddish texts searchable.

Blog

A Peacock’s Dream: Introducing In geveb

Eitan Kensky and Saul Noam Zaritt

Welcome to In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies, the online home for Yiddish Studies. In geveb aims to be a central address for the study of all things Yiddish—the focal point for discussions of Yiddish literature, language, and culture, and 
the home for the next generation of Yiddish scholarship.

Blog

Best Dressed Male Yiddish Cultural Figures

Saul Noam Zaritt

What the ascot can teach us about Yiddish cultural history.

Blog

Incomplete Yiddish Philology

Saul Noam Zaritt

Ever wonder why the Yiddish dictionary has only four volumes, all for the letter aleph? Click here to find out!

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