“Modernism”

Article

The Shtik Kabole Niger Couldn’t Digest: Poetry, Messianism, and Literatoyre in Aaron Zeitlin’s Keter

Nathan Wolski

This study presents a translation and analysis of Aaron Zeitlin’s (1898-1973) poem “Keter: Fragmenten fun a rapsodye,” published in 1923, at the height of the Warsaw expressionist explosion of the early twenties.

Blog

In Edenia, a City of the Future

Yevgeniy Fiks

Yevgeniy Fiks and Larissa Babji invited artists to engage with Kalman Zingman’s 1918 Yiddish-language utopian novella In der tsukunft-shtot edenia (In Edenia, a City of the Future), published in Kharkiv, Ukraine. They displayed the results in an exhibition at Yermilov Center in Kharkiv, Ukraine in June 2017. Here they discuss the novel, the process that led to the exhibition, and the political and social realities that their project sought to address.

Review

Review of A Rich Brew: How Cafés Created Modern Jewish Culture by Shachar M. Pinsker

Jeffrey Yoskowitz

Shachar M. Pinsker’s latest work is a lively examination of the role of cafés as meeting grounds for Jewish writers and thinkers in the modern period of transnational migration, from 1848-1939.

Blog

Yiddish Moves

Richard J. Fein

Not a translation! An original English-language Yiddish poem.

Review

Strangers in Berlin by Rachel Seelig

Sunny Yudkoff

Seelig's new book explores the city of Berlin during the Weimar period as a "transit station" for Jewish literature written in German, Yiddish, and Hebrew.

Review

Miriam Udel’s Never Better! The Modern Jewish Picaresque

Matthew Johnson

Miriam Udel's new book travels with the genre of the picaresque from the shtetl to the USA to the USSR and brings it into the twentieth century.

Text & Translation

דער פֿערציקיעריקער מאַן

The Forty-Year-Old Man

Peretz Markish

Translation by Rose Waldman

New translations of four sections from Markish's book-length modernist poem.

Blog

The Virtuoso of Loneliness: A Brief Invitation to Leyeles

Zackary Sholem Berger

Hear the voice of Yiddish poet Aaron Glantz-Leyeles as he meditates on the loneliness of the Yiddish writer while still embracing the magic of the American landscape.