“Hasidism”

Blog

Going Off Script: The Contradictory Pleasures of Unorthodox

Roni Masel

Roni Masel proposes a "failed watching" of Netflix's new series Unorthodox that sidesteps questions of authenticity in representation and instead "generates what we could call queer pleasure or OTD pleasure."

Blog

Briv funem Arkhiv: 1987 Poster Announcing Pilgrimages to Lezajsk (Lizhensk)

Shifra Epstein

Posters like this one for special events, graduations, sales of Hasidic garments, computers, new books, videos and more are still popular in the Hasidic neighborhoods of Brooklyn. However, in recent years the internet has changed the business.

Text & Translation

מועתק בלשונו הק׳

In His Holy Idiom

R. Aaron of Karlin

Translation by Joshua Schwartz

Text & Translation

דער רבי ר' בעריש בעל־תּשובֿה פֿון קראָקע

The Rebbe R. Berish Bal-tshuve of Krakow

Meir Bałaban

Translation by Avinoam J. Stillman

1931 newspaper article by the Polish Jewish historian Meir Bałaban concerning the curious Hasidic figure known as Berish Bal-tshuve

Blog

“Being a man was about being tough, not backing down”: Rappers, Hasids, Sabras, and the Battle for the Future of Jewish Israeli Male Identity

Avi Blitz

Zionism sought to alter forever the image of the Jewish male. Avi Blitz looks at what happened, and how Yiddish fits in.


Special Issue

Religious Thought in Yiddish

Articles, translations, resources

This special issue of In geveb, edited by Ariel Evan Mayse, Naomi Seidman, Marc Caplan, and Daniel Reiser, explores a range of theological, philosophical, and other religious themes as presented in a wide variety of Yiddish writings.

Article

Kratsn in der linker peye: yidish, yidishkayt, un dos pintele yid: A special issue of In geveb on Religious Thought in Yiddish

Ariel Evan Mayse, Naomi Seidman, Marc Caplan and Daniel Reiser

An introduction from the editors of the special issue of In geveb on Religious Thought in Yiddish.

Article

Traveling and Traversing Chabad’s Literary Paths: From Likutei torah to Khayim gravitser and Beyond

Eli Rubin

This paper aims to complicate the neat chronology that bifurcates modern Jewish literature from its Hasidic roots, using Fishl Schneersohn's novel Khayim Gravitser and Avraham Shlonsky's Hebrew translation of the novel to demonstrate that these authors continued the Hasidic literary tradition of Chabad even as they embraced alternative literary forms in the cause of new aesthetic agendas.