Blog

Essays, interviews, listicles, podcasts, and much more, covering all aspects of Yiddish culture.

Blog

The Yiddishist Vote: Responses to Trump

The Editors

A round-up of responses to the election of Donald Trump by scholars of Yiddish.

Blog

לויט די לייענערס | Readers Respond: Tell Us What You Really Think

The Editors

This summer we conducted a survey of our readers to find out what you think about us, here’s what we learned.

Blog

On My Own in Omaha: On Learning Yiddish Solo

Max Sparber

The challenges and rewards of learning Yiddish on your own.

Interview

Spectacular Vernacular: An Interview with Ezra Berkley Nepon on New Yiddish Theater, Queer Performance Arts, and “Dazzle Camouflage”

Anna Elena Torres

On the beautiful, radical, accessible, possibilities of performance and Yiddish.

Interview

“Conversion through language”: Mo Pareles on Yiddish, Old English, and the Temporal Other

Sarah Ellen Zarrow

A medievalist uses Yiddish in her scriptural scholarship.

Blog

Yiddish has a word for that! Notes on the Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary (2016)

Isaac L. Bleaman

Isaac Bleaman goes to Yidish-vokh and reports back from a conversation between the editors of the new Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary.

Blog

Call for Special Issues

The Editors

In geveb seeks proposals for Special Issues of the journal.

Interview

Radical, Rational Eating: Eve Jochnowitz on Eastern European Vegetarians, Jewish Politics, and Translating The Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook

Sarah Ellen Zarrow

Eve Jochnowitz discusses the rise of vegetarian cuisine among Jews, leftist politics, and how to make gefilte fish without any fish at all.

Blog

The Lonely Hero Needs Reanimating: Poems by Yisroel Nekrasov | רעאַנימאַטאָרן קענען אַלץ: לידער פֿון ישׂראל נעקראַסאָוו

Zackary Sholem Berger

A new book of contemporary Yiddish poetry from the Russian writer Yisroel Nekrasov considers murder, reanimation, the geography of time, and the long work of mourning.

Blog

“What a ‘Medina’ is Amerikay”: Postvernacular Yiddish in Nineteenth-Century America

Shari Rabin

In mid-nineteenth century America, early use of postvernacular Yiddish helped Jews locate themselves in the culture.

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