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Essays, interviews, listicles, podcasts, and much more, covering all aspects of Yiddish culture.

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Samy Szlingerbaum’s Heymish Avant-Garde Kino der Mamen: Mysteries, Music, & Immigrant Life in “Brussels Transit”

Eve Sic­u­lar offers an exe­ge­sis of Samy Szlinger­baum’s recent­ly restored auto­bi­o­graph­i­cal cin­e­mat­ic mas­ter­piece, which depicts a Jew­ish family’s dis­place­ment in the after­math of World War II.

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Feminism, Creativity and Translation: Chava Rosenfarb Translates Jewish-Canadian Women Writers into Yiddish

Goldie Mor­gen­taler reflects on why her moth­er, the nov­el­ist Cha­va Rosen­farb, might have cho­sen to trans­late the work of two oth­er Jew­ish Cana­di­an women writ­ers — her friends Miri­am Wadding­ton and Adele Wise­man, who both wrote in Eng­lish — into Yiddish.

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A Conversation on Yiddish Studies, Jewish Studies, and Ukraine

Amelia Glaser and Jef­frey Vei­dlinger have been engaged with shar­ing their exper­tise — lit­er­ary and his­tor­i­cal — about Jew­ish his­to­ries of Ukraine. We asked them what they have to say about the war in Ukraine to the Yid­dish stud­ies schol­ars, stu­dents, and com­mu­ni­ty of In geveb.

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The Latest in Yiddish Studies in English: 2021

The 2021 install­ment of our annu­al effort to gath­er togeth­er the lat­est pub­li­ca­tions rel­e­vant to Yid­dish Stud­ies in English.

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Theater Review: Di Yiddishe Vayb

Dylan Seders Hoff­man reviews Di Yid­dishe Vayb (“The Jew­ish Wife”), a new play cre­at­ed and direct­ed by New Orleans-based artist Rachel Lee and per­formed at the Bor­derLight Fringe Fes­ti­val in Cleve­land, Ohio in July 2021.

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In geveb is seeking a Peer Review Editorial Associate

In geveb is seek­ing to hire a Peer Review Edi­to­r­i­al Asso­ciate for the 2022 – 2023 aca­d­e­m­ic year. This new mem­ber of our edi­to­r­i­al team who will take an active role in the col­lab­o­ra­tive work of the journal. 

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How to Suppress Tea Arciszewska’s Writing: A Case Study

Faith Jones’ analy­sis of the strate­gies used to sup­press Yid­dish women’s writ­ing (based on Joan­na Russ’s 1983 essay) help us under­stand the ways that Tea Arciszewska’s male con­tem­po­raries all too often belit­tled and dis­missed her contributions.

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How to Suppress Yiddish Women’s Writing

Joan­na Russ’ 1983 schemat­ic of strate­gies and dynam­ics that sup­press wom­en’s writ­ing — along with some addi­tions spe­cif­ic to mod­ern Yid­dish cul­ture — helps explain both the his­tor­i­cal sup­pres­sion of Yid­dish women writ­ers and more recent chal­lenges to fem­i­nist schol­ar­ship on wom­en’s Yid­dish writ­ing. Faith Jones guides us to make the Yid­dish future togeth­er, and to make our place in it.

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Beyond the Theater of Memory: Reflections on Yiddish Singing in the German-Speaking World

Isabel Frey reflects on the chal­lenges and pos­si­bil­i­ties of per­form­ing Yid­dish music as a Jew­ish per­former in Ger­many and Aus­tria beyond the insu­lat­ed Berlin klezmer scene.

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Discovering Di Froyen

The fabled book­let Di Froyen Women and Yid­dish: Trib­ute to the Past, Direc­tions for the Future: Con­fer­ence Pro­ceed­ings, pub­lished in 1997, which records the Di froyen con­fer­ence held Octo­ber 28 – 29, 1995, reminds us of the conference’s lega­cy as a turn­ing point for women in Yid­dish. More than that, it under­scores par­tic­i­pants’ vision­ary goals and uphill work to achieve them. It also rais­es ques­tions of gen­der, lan­guage, and pow­er that con­tin­ue to ani­mate con­tem­po­rary fem­i­nist Yid­dishist debates.

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