Articles

Essays and peer-reviewed scholarship in Yiddish Studies, an interdisciplinary field that engages all aspects of Yiddish cultural production, especially in its relationship to other cultures and languages.

Click here for a separate listing of open-access, peer-reviewed articles.

Review

Review of: Benny Mer, Smocza: A Biography of a Jewish Street in Warsaw

Meirav Reuveny

The history of Smocza, a Jewish Street in Warsaw, is not the story of the world-renowned figures, but rather of every person who ever lived or died there, including those who are lost to our collective memory.

Review

Review of Seeds in the Desert by Mendel Mann, translated and with an introduction by Heather Valencia

Shachar Pinsker

These stories take place in Israeli cities, towns, and villages, in the post-war Soviet Union, and in Poland of the interwar period. However, it is often very difficult to tell where the stories actually take place, because they express an experience of dislocation and total disorientation.

Review

A Double Dose of Early Twentieth-Century Yiddish Talush-hood: Two New Translations by Daniel Kennedy

Ri J. Turner

In new translations by Daniel Kennedy, Hersh Dovid Nomberg’s Warsaw Stories (White Goat Press) and Zalman Shneour’s A Death: Notes of a Suicide (Wakefield Press) can rightfully be labeled “classic”; they reach across time and space to name an eternal — and unromantic — facet of human experience.

Review

The post-Holocaust Parisian “Phalanstery” of 9 rue Guy Patin and its Legacies. Review of Rachel Ertel, Mémoire du yiddish

Constance Pâris de Bollardière

Rachel Ertel has been one of the most prolific translators from Yiddish to French. In Mémoire du yiddish: Transmettre une langue assassinée [A Memory of Yiddish: Transmitting an Assassinated Language], an interview with the French journalist Stéphane Bou published as a book in 2019, Rachel Ertel, who was born in July 1939, looks back chronologically on her life’s journey.

Article

Introduction: Translation - Poetics, Negotiation, Tradaptation; A Special Issue of In geveb on Translation

Olaf Terpitz and Marianne Windsperger

The contributions of this special issue showcase the performative dimension of translation: Musicians and poets (when reading their texts) draw attention to the interactions between languages, phonetic experiences, rhythm, rhyme, and the productive use of misunderstandings. Critical reflections on their own translations, and the role performed by agents such as editors (e.g. of selection and design), engender the question of what it meant historically and what it means today to be a writer or reader in multilingual settings.

Article

Louis Zukofsky: Building a Poetics of Translation

Sarah Ponichtera

How the poet Louis Zukofsky constructed his English-language American modernism by citing, translating, and adapting the Yiddish poetry of Yehoash.

Article

Literarishe reveransn”: Yiddish Translation as Negotiation

Augusta Costiuc Radosav

Radosav discusses her experiences as a translator of Yiddish poetry into Romanian and her evaluation of certain translations from other languages into Romanian or from Romanian into Yiddish. The essay outlines a strategy of “translation-recreation,” in which the translator balances a sense of fidelity to the source text with the attempt to creatively reproduce its internal mechanism.

Article

Molded Inexorably by the Times: Rachel Wischnitzer’s and Franzisca Baruch’s Collaboration on the Headlines of Rimon/Milgroym

Ishai Mishory

Mishory examines the collaborative work of art historian Rachel Wischnitzer (1885-1989), and Jewish-German designer and typographer Franzisca Baruch (1901-1989), demonstrating that Baruch’s revival of medieval Hebrew letterforms in her work on Rimon/Milgroym and her use of fragmentation as a strategy for visual, textual, and cultural revival was in conversation with Wischnitzer’s scholarship.

Review

The Lower East Side as an American Site of Memory

Abigail Lewis

In her work on images of the Lower East Side, Blair spotlights the paradoxes of the neighborhood’s dynamic status as site of memory and of artistic experimentation and highlights stories and voices often left out of American collective memory.

Review

Review of The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Stage by Alyssa Quint

Debra Caplan

The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Stage is a monumental work that tells the story of Avrom Goldfaden, Yiddish theater’s most central, confounding, and enigmatic figure while also situating it in the context of Yiddish theater’s initial development.

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