Texts & Translation

צוויי לידער

Two Poems

Celia Dropkin

Translation by Shoshana Olidort

INTRODUCTION

Inter­est in Celia Drop­kin, the Yid­dish poet who (self-) pub­lished only a sin­gle, slim vol­ume of poet­ry dur­ing her life­time, seems to have peaked in recent years, par­tic­u­lar­ly fol­low­ing the 2014 release of The Acro­bat (Tebot Bach), which fea­tured a selec­tion of Dropkin’s poems trans­lat­ed by Faith Jones, Jen­nifer Kro­novet, and Samuel Solomon. Drop­kin, who was born in Belarus in 1887, began writ­ing poet­ry in Russ­ian as a young girl. In 1912, she moved to New York and soon after began writ­ing in Yid­dish. Her work appeared in promi­nent Yid­dish lit­er­ary pub­li­ca­tions of the time. But it isn’t just Yid­dishists who find Dropkin’s voice com­pelling. As the Amer­i­can poet Alice Not­ley points out in her blurb for the recent vol­ume, Dropkin’s poems are of their time in the best pos­si­ble way: you want to be there then, too.” 

Ear­li­er this sum­mer, while on a vis­it to the YIVO archives to comb through the Drop­kin papers, I came across the expand­ed 1959 vol­ume of her work that was released posthu­mous­ly by Dropkin’s chil­dren. This vol­ume fea­tures not only addi­tion­al poems, but also prose work and some of Dropkin’s art­work. It was in this vol­ume that I hap­pened upon The Bal­lad of the Old Woman with the Bas­ket and the Pas­sen­gers on a Refugee Ship,” a poem that struck me as pro­found­ly of our own time. I was remind­ed that the best poet­ry and lit­er­a­ture is tru­ly time­less. In addi­tion to this bal­lad, I include here my trans­la­tion of Dropkin’s Pigeons on Wel­fare Island,” because of its play­ful­ness, which I thought works nice­ly to bal­ance out the somber tone and mood of the bal­lad. I am grate­ful to Faith Jones, who con­nect­ed me with Celia’s grand­daugh­ter Frances Drop­kin, and to Frances for her per­mis­sion to pub­lish these trans­la­tions. Thank you also to Faith for shar­ing her unpub­lished trans­la­tions (with Kro­novet and Solomon) of these poems with me, and to Frances, Sebas­t­ian Schul­man and Anas­tasiya Lyubas for their thought­ful feed­back on my translations. 

Shoshana Oli­dort

Click here to down­load a PDF of this text and its translation.

די באַלאַדע פֿון דער אַלטער מיטן קױש און די פּאַסאַזשירן אױף אַ פֿליכטלינגשיף

אײַנגעװעבט אין זיך די גרױקייט פֿון ים,
אײַנגעזאַפּט אין זיך דאָס װיגליד פֿון ים,
אײַנגעזאַפּט אין זיך דעם װײַסן שױם,
דעם זילבערשױם
פֿון װאָלקנס װײַסע שאָף —
— שלאָף, שלאָף!

װיגן װיגט מיך אײַן געשמאַק אַזױ
אַן אַלטע, אַלטע פֿרױ
מיט גרױע לאַנג־צעלאָזטע האָר,
אירע אױגן װאַסערדיק, ניט־קלאָר,
איר קול אַ מאָנאָטאָנער רױש,
זי װיגט מיך אין אַ גרױסן װאַסערקױש,
זי װיגט מיך מיט אירע אַלטע הענט,
זי װיגט און טראָגט מיך װײַט אין כװאַליענדיקן רױם,
און פּלוצלינג װעקט זי מיך : שטײ אױף, שטײ אױף!
עס ענטפֿערן סירענען, װי אַ װידערקול.
אַ שיף באַװײַזט זיך מיט אַ מאָל,
און מענטשן שטײען שװײַגנדיק בײַם ראַנד פֿון שיף,
און מענטשן קוקן שטילע אין דער טיף.

די אַלטע טוט אַ װיג פֿאַר זײ איר װאַסערקױש,
זי רעדט, איר קול איז מאָנאָטאָנער רױש:

„איר האָט גערופֿן מיך,
איך בין געקומען גיך,
װי אַ מוטער צו אַ קינד אין נױט.
עס איז דאָס אומגליק גרױס,
נאָר װי אַ מוטערס שױס
מײַן קױש איז אָנגעגרײט“.

די אַלטע װיגט פֿאַר זײ דעם װאַסערקױש,
זי רעדט, איר קול איז מאָנאָטאָנער רױש:
„פֿאַרטריבן פֿון דער הײם?

מײַן װײַסער שױם
איז אײַער הײם!
פֿאַרשפּאַרט איז יעדע טיר?

ניט קלאַפּט אומזיסט, ניט בעט,
איך עפֿן אױף אַ טיר
און זעט:
עס װאַרט אױף אײַך אַ בעט...

פֿאַרבאָטן יעדער ברעג?
אָן גרענעץ איז דער װעג
בײַם סוף פֿון אײַערע טעג.

איר האָט גערופֿן מיך,
איך בין געקומען גיך
װי אַ מוטער צו אַ קינד אין נױט.

עס איז דאָס אומגליק גרױס,
נאָר װי אַ מוטערס שױס
װאַרט אױף אײַך מײַן טרײסט.

פֿאַרשפּאַרט איז יעדע טיר?
ניט קלאַפּט אומזיסט, ניט בעט,
איך עפֿן אױף אַ טיר
צו אַ קילן, לאַשטשענדיקן בעט.

פֿאַרבאָטן יעדער ברעג?
אָן גרענעץ איז דער װעג,
בײַם סוף פֿון אײַערע טעג.
פֿאַרטריבן פֿון דער הײם?

מײַן װײַסער שױם איז אײַער הײם,
אין אײַער װײַסן, װײכן בעט —
דערהערט איז דאָס געבעט“.

The Ballad of the Old Woman with the Basket and the Passengers on a Refugee Ship


Woven within the grayness of the sea
Absorbed within the lullaby of the sea
Absorbed within the white foam,
the silver foam
of the clouds’ white sheep—
—Sleep, sleep!

An old, old woman
with long-loose grey hair
rocks me, rocking with such feeling
her eyes watery, blurry,
her voice a monotonous murmur.
She rocks me in a large water-basket,
she rocks me with her old hands,
she rocks and carries me far into the undulating space.
Suddenly, she wakes me: Get up, get up!
I hear in her voice a melancholic cry,
and sirens answer, like an echo.
All at once, a ship appears
and people stand quietly at the edge of the ship
and people look silently into the depths.
The old one pushes her water-basket, rocking it for them,
she speaks, her voice a monotonous murmur:
“You called to me,
I came swiftly
like a mother to a child in need.
The misfortune is great,
but like a mother’s bosom
my basket is prepared.”
The old one rocks the water-basket for them,
she speaks, her voice a monotonous murmur:
“Dispossessed of home?
My white foam
is your home!


Is every door locked?
Don’t knock in vain, don’t beg
I open up a door
and see:
A bed awaits you . . .

Is every shore blocked?
Boundless is the way
at the end of your days.

You called to me,
I came swiftly
like a mother to a child in need.

The misfortune is great,
but like a mother’s bosom
my consolation awaits.

Is every door locked?
Don’t knock in vain, don’t beg
I open up a door
to a cool, cozy bed.

Is every shore blocked?
Boundless is the way
at the end of your days.

Dispossessed of home?
My white foam is your home,
in your soft, white bed—
your prayer has been heard.”

טױבן אױפֿן װעלפֿײר־אײַלאַנד

אַפֿילו די טױבן װערן דאָ אַלט און קראַנק,
און די גלאַטקײט פֿון זײערע פֿליגלען
װערט צעשטערט,
די אײגעלעך, װי פֿון בעלמעס, װערן ניט־קלאָר,
און עס שטעקן מיאוסע פֿעדערלעך, װי גרױע האָר,
אױפֿן פּערל־מוטערנעם רוקן.
נידעריק צו דער ערד
די מידע קעפּלעך זײ בוקן;
װי צעריסענע אָסיענבלעטער, װי אַלטינקע קראַנקע,
שלײַכן זײ אַרום איבער דער ערד.

Pigeons on Welfare Island

Even the pigeons here get old and sick,
the smoothness of their wings
becomes disheveled,
their eyes blurred, as if from cataracts
and ugly little feathers, like grey hairs
stick out on their mother-of-pearl backs.
Low near the ground
they bow their tired heads.
Like torn autumn leaves, like the elderly and sickly
they slink around over the ground.

MLA STYLE
Dropkin, Celia. “Two Poems.” In geveb, October 2018: Trans. Shoshana Olidort. https://ingeveb.org/texts-and-translations/two-poems-dropkin.
CHICAGO STYLE
Dropkin, Celia. “Two Poems.” Translated by Shoshana Olidort. In geveb (October 2018): Accessed Jan 24, 2021.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Celia Dropkin

ABOUT THE TRANSLATOR

Shoshana Olidort