Text & Translation

צװיי לידער

Two Poems

Itzik Manger

Translation by Murray Citron

INTRODUCTION

To rhyme or not to rhyme? In the world of contemporary poetry, rhyming translations are not exactly in fashion. Modern poets tend to favor more understated approaches to building rhythm and cadence, but what happens when a poem is also a song? How should one translate a writer like Itzik Manger whose poetry owes so much to the ballad or folk-song?

Manger himself was no stranger to the question; his first book-length publication was Felker zingen, a 1936 collection of folk songs translated from a variety of languages.

In the preface, Manger writes “My approach [ … ] has not been folkloristic, but aesthetic. So I have allowed myself to take many liberties, they have not so much been translated, but remodelled, rewritten.”

Translator Murray Citron has not taken the same liberties as Manger did, but he believes that in order to carry Manger’s poetic effects into English, he must pay attention to meter and rhyme, sometimes at the expense of the literal meaning of the words.

Click here to download a PDF of this text and its translation.


כ’וועל אויסטאָן די שיך


כ’וועל אויסטאָן די שיך און דעם טרויער,
און קומען צו דיר צוריק
אָט אַזוי ווי איך בין אַ פֿאַרשפּילטער,
און שטעלן זיך פֿאַר דײַן בליק.

מײַן גאָט, מײַן האַר, מײַן באַשאַפֿער,
לײַטער מיך אויס אין דײַן שײַן
אָט ליג איך פֿאַר דיר אויף אַ וואָלקן
פֿאַרוויג מיך און שלעפֿער מיך אײַן.

און רעד צו מיר גוטע ווערטער,
און זאָג מיר אַז איך בין „דײַן קינד“.
און קוש מיך אַראָפּ פֿונעם שטערן
די צייכנס פון מײַנע זינד.

איך האָב דאָך געטאָן דײַן שליחות
און געטראָגן דײַן געטלעך ליד
צי בין איך דען שולדיק, וואָס גראַמט זיך,
על־פּי טעות „ייִד“ מיט „ליד“.

צי בין איך דען שולדיק, וואָס גראַמט זיך,
על־פּי טעות „שיין“ מיט „געוויין“,
און די בענקשאַפט, די אמת’ע בענקשאַפֿט,
וואָגלט כּסדר אַליין?

צי בין איך דען שולדיק דערלויכטער,
וואָס כ’בין איצט דערשלאָגן און מיד,
און לייג דיר אַוועק צופֿוסנס,
דאָס דאָזיקע מידע ליד?

מײַן גאָט, מײַן האַר, מײַן באַשאַפֿער,
לײַטער מיך אויס אין דײַן שײַן
אָט ליג איך פֿאַר דיר אויף אַ וואָלקן
פאַרוויג מיך און שלעפֿער מיך אײַן.

I'll Take Off My Shoes


I’ll take off my shoes and my sorrow,
And come back to Your ways.
Now my game is played out and over,
I place myself in Your gaze.

My God, my Lord, my Creator,
My path has been troubled and steep.
Now I lie on a cloud before You—
Take me and rock me to sleep.

And speak to me words of comfort,
And tell me I am Your child,
And wipe my sins from my forehead,
With a kiss forgiving and mild.

I have carried out Your commandment,
My poems were written for You—
Is it my fault and my burden
That it happens that “Jew” rhymes with “you”?

And is it my fault then that “beauty”
With “duty” happens to rhyme,
And longing, deep-seated longing,
Is shut up alone with time?

And am I to blame, Light-giver,
If weary with loss and defeat,
I bring this weary poem,
And lay it at your feet?

My God, my Lord, my Creator,
My path has been troubled and steep.
Now I lie on a cloud before You—
Take me and rock me to sleep.

אבֿרהם אבֿינו פֿאָרט מיט יצחקן צו דער עקידה


די גראָע מאָרגן־דעמערונג
דעמערט איבער דער ערד.
דער אַלטער געטרייַער אליעזר שפּאַנט
אין וואָגן די קאַרע פֿערד.

אבֿרהם אבֿינו טראָגט אויף זייַנע הענט
זייַן בן־זקיינים ארויס,
אַ פֿרומער בלאָער שטערן בליצט
איבער דעם אַלטן הויז.

„הייַדאַ אליעזר!“ – דאָס בייַטשל קנאַלט
און אָט זילבערט זיך דער שליאַך,
[טרויעריק און שיין, זאָגט דער פּאָעט,
זענען די וועגן פֿון תּנ"ך].

די גראָע ווערבעס פּאַזע וועג
אַנטלויפֿן אויף צוריק,
אַ קוק טון, צי די מאַמע וויינט
איבער דער פּוסטער וויג.

„וווּ פֿאָרן מיר איצטער, טאַטעשי?“
„קיין לאַשקעוו אויפֿן יריד“.
„וואָס וועסטו מיר קויפֿן, טאַטעשי,
אין לאַשקעוו אויפֿן יריד?“

„אַ זעלנערל פֿון פּאָרצעליי,
אַ פֿייקל און אַ טרומייט
און פֿאַר דער מאַמען אין דער היים
אַטלעס אויף א קלייד“.

אבֿרהמס אויגן ווערן פֿייכט,
ער פֿילט ווי דאָס מעסער בריט
אונטער דער זשופּיצע דאָס לייב:
שוין איינמאָל א יריד...

„אליעזר, בייַ דער וואַסערפֿאַל,
דאָרט זאָלסטו בלייַבן שטיין!
פֿון דאָרט וועל איך מיט יצחקלען
צו פֿוס שוין ווייטער גיין“.

אליעזר אויף דער קעלניע ברומט
און קוקט אלץ אויפֿן שליאַך.
[טרויעריק און שיין, זאָגט דער פּאָעט,
זענען די וועגן פֿון תּנ"ך]

Abraham Our Father Takes Isaac To The Sacrifice

The gray dawn spreads across the land.
The time has come to start.
Faithful old Eliezer hitches
The horses to the cart.

Abraham carries in his arms
The son of his old age.
The pious morning star looks down
At the blue-lit pilgrimage.

“Let’s go, Eliezer,” and the whip
Across the horses plays
(Sad and lovely, says the poet
Are the Torah’s ways).

The weeping willows that they pass
And the dusty roadside shrubs
Run back to see by an empty crib
If the mother sits and sobs.

“Where are we going, Daddy, today?
“To Lashkev, to the fair.”
“What will you buy me, Daddy, then,
In Lashkev at the fair?”

“A soldier made of porcelain,
A trumpet and a drum,
And a roll of satin cloth to make
A garment for your Mom.”

Abraham’s eyes are moist. He feels
Under his cloak to where
The knife is hot against his skin.
—Yes. A fine affair …

“Eliezer, you will wait for us
There beside the wood.
I and little Isaac will
Go on from here on foot.”

Eliezer gazes at the road
In the morning haze
(Sweet and somber, says the poet
Are the Torah’s ways)

MLA STYLE
Manger, Itzik. “Two Poems.” In geveb, October 2017: Trans. Murray Citron. https://ingeveb.org/texts-and-translations/two-poems.
CHICAGO STYLE
Manger, Itzik. “Two Poems.” Translated by Murray Citron. In geveb (October 2017): Accessed Dec 18, 2017.

ABOUT THE TRANSLATOR

Murray Citron

Murray Citron is an Ottawa-based translator.